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What’s the Big Deal With Data?

Plenty, according to new report from BSA | The Software Alliance

We are generating more data today than ever before – and it’s improving everything from healthcare and auto safety to education and air travel. More than 90 percent of the world’s data was created in the last two years, and we now are doubling the amount of data created every two years. Once constrained by storage capacity, there is now expected to be enough data to stack 128-gigabyte tablets from Earth to the moon 6.6 times by the end of the decade, according to a 2014 EMC Digital Universe study.

Now, our biggest challenge is figuring out what to do with all of this information and how to leverage it – and that’s where software comes into play.

Today, BSA | The Software Alliance released a report that explores this data revolution and its positive impact on many different industries around the globe. Our What’s the Big Deal With Data? report examines the massive potential of data and dispels some common data myths. Along with the Data Innovation Executive Survey we released last December, this report shows how the benefits of data innovation stretch across the global economy and are not limited to software companies.

With lower storage costs and more powerful processing capabilities, software is unlocking valuable insights contained within data to benefit society and improve lives. Here are just a few ways data is enabling progress and revolutionizing the way we live:

  • Increasing Farming Yields.
  • Building Smart Cities.
  • Designing Energy-Efficient Buildings.
  • Reducing Commute Times.
  • Fighting Disease.

We hope this report starts many conversations about the integral role of data in our lives. The more we know about data, the better we can leverage its countless possibilities. To read our full study, please visit www.bsa.org/data.

Victoria Espinel

Author:

Victoria Espinel is a respected authority on the intersection of technology innovation, global markets and public policy. She leads strategic efforts that help shape the technology landscape in 60 countries through work in BSA’s 10 global offices.

Espinel also serves as the President of Software.org: the BSA Foundation. Software.org is an independent and nonpartisan international research organization created to help policymakers and the broader public better understand the impact that software has on our lives, our economy, and our society.

Espinel served for a decade in the White House, for both Republican and Democratic Administrations as President Obama’s advisor on intellectual property and, before that, as the first ever chief US trade negotiator for intellectual property and innovation at USTR. She was also a professor of international trade and intellectual property at the George Mason School of Law.

Espinel is a founding and ongoing co-sponsor of Girls Who Code’s Washington, DC, summer immersion program, which empowers young women to pursue careers in STEM fields. She speaks before audiences around the world to build visibility for the amazing things people can do with software, and encourages businesses, governments, and the public to support a policy environment that will enable even more software breakthroughs.

Espinel chairs the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on the Digital Economy and Society. She was appointed by President Obama to serve on the Advisory Committee on Trade Policy and Negotiations (ACTPN), the principal advisory group for the US government on international trade. She holds an LLM from the London School of Economics, a JD from Georgetown University Law School, and a BS in Foreign Service from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. Follow her on Twitter: @victoriaespinel.

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