Archive for the ‘Industry’ Category

An Open Letter to Congress: Software Industry’s Priorities Create Jobs

posted by in Data, Industry, Intellectual Property January 12, 2017

Dear 115th Congress,

Congratulations on your election to office – we look forward to working with you. Job creation will undoubtedly be a top priority on your list in the coming year, and it’s a top priority for our industry. As our recent economic impact report shows (done in collaboration with the Economist Intelligence Unit) the software industry contributes more than $1 trillion to the US GDP, nearly 10 million jobs, and $52 billion in R&D, with significant effects in each of the 50 states. As you begin your work, we’d like to draw your attention to software industry priorities that directly impact jobs in the US.

It’s predicted that by 2020, the number of new computing jobs in the US will rise to 1.4 million, but we’ll have just 400,000 computer science students with the skills to apply for them. Congress can and must make investments in STEM education. With the proper training, thousands more Americans will be prepared to take those great-paying jobs.

To help increase jobs in the US, Congress can maintain a firm stance on international data policy. Companies of all sizes across all industries rely on the ability to transfer data around the world to provide essential services. Recently, other governments have pushed to keep data within the confines of their borders. This would have serious effects on the ability of businesses in the US to offer services abroad, and thus threaten American jobs. Congress can help businesses in all 50 states grow by supporting a strong data policy agenda.

The software industry also hopes to see Congress work on polices to properly protect intellectual property. These policies will in turn foster jobs because they encourage the research and development that drives innovation. Patent reform can reduce frivolous litigation and free up resources for greater investment. Congress should look to enable the jobs of the future as software continues to develop a range of cutting-edge technologies that greatly improve lives and help solve intractable problems.

Software is and will continue to be a major driver of jobs in the US. We stand ready to support you in improving the lives of our citizens and the economic future of our country.

Sincerely,

The Software Industry c/o BSA | The Software Alliance

BSA Celebrates the Software of 2016

posted by in Industry December 20, 2016

With 2016 coming to a close, BSA’s global staff took some time to look back and name the software that helped them the most this year.

BSA Celebrates the Software of 2016

Building on a Constructive Conversation

posted by in Industry December 16, 2016

Wednesday’s meeting between President-elect Trump and executives from numerous software and technology companies has been reported with great fanfare. Rather than the tense exchange that many pundits predicted, the sit-down provided an opportunity for a constructive conversation. This is a welcome development, and it points to a real opportunity for government and industry to work together to help bolster the $1 trillion impact that the software industry has all across the US economy.

Here are some ways we can work toward that goal: The president-elect and software companies can help grow jobs in the United States by focusing on efforts to bolster STEM education and improve training programs. The incoming administration can also ensure that the path forward on trade ensures a level playing field in the digital space. Across the administration’s developing agenda – from efforts to make reduce government waste and improve services to projects to update infrastructure – software and software companies can offer real expertise and improvements.

Making progress here will require hard work and engagement and we look forward to working toward these goals.

Is It Santa or Software?

posted by in Industry December 15, 2016

The holiday season is in full swing and many of us are shopping for presents. We’ve talked a lot on TechPost about how software affects almost every aspect of our daily lives, and gift-giving is no exception. From making the present to capturing the joy, software is helping us out this holiday season.

Let’s say you want to buy a stuffed bear for your baby niece – let’s call her Zoe. Software can help you every step of the way.

Making

There would be no stuffed bears without the toy companies that design and make them. Before we even start to think about gifts, toymakers are hard at work preparing for the holiday season. Software allows manufacturers to get instant feedback from their customers to design the best possible product. Design software combines 3D modeling with IoT development tools, so that manufacturers can build smart components into their products right from the start. So not only can designers model the bear’s features from 360 degrees, they can also plan to program an “intelligent assistant” so the bear can speak to Zoe.

Shopping

Once you find the perfect bear, it’s time to buy it. Software and chip technology protect your information by generating a unique one-time code for every transaction that verifies the card’s authenticity. The chip also encrypts your information during the transaction to guard against identify theft. Banks use software to flag suspicious purchases and alert you of any potential credit card fraud.

Shipping

Software helps get the bear to Zoe quickly and accurately. During peak holiday season, companies like UPS each deliver around 30 million packages. Telematic sensors in tens of thousands of delivery trucks track engine performance, improve routes, and anticipate maintenance or route problems in advance. Shipping companies use data collected by vehicle sensors to save millions of gallons of fuel through more efficient logistics. Thanks to GPS tracking and AI, companies can predict weather patterns and anticipate delays. Cloud computing helps expand these systems to the thousands of additional employees hired during the holiday rush, and makes sure the bear gets to Zoe on time.

Sharing the Joy

Zoe loves her bear and her mom texts you a photo of her giggling with her new toy. Photo software helps ensure the picture is of the highest resolution and the lighting is just right. Once Zoe’s mom has a great photo, she sends it to you over a wireless network that runs on software. Wherever you are in the world, you can share in the joy.

In the mad rush between buying presents and spending time with family and friends, we may not realize how much work software does behind the scenes. Whether it’s a stuffed bear or the latest tech gadget, software helps businesses and people select, purchase, create, send, and receive their gifts on time. In the season of giving, software is doing just that.

Happy Holidays from BSA!

Building on Today’s Achievements, the EU Can Harness Software’s Full Potential

posted by in Industry November 22, 2016

This article originally ran on EurActiv on November 22, 2016.

We live with the benefits of software every day; so much so, in fact, it easy to underestimate its contribution.

Software contributes almost one trillion Euros to the EU’s GDP (including indirect and induced effects); if the software industry’s total contribution in Europe were a Member State, it would be the EU’s sixth largest economy. The software industry also supports jobs for almost 12 million people across Europe (including indirect and induced effects) and contributes more than 7 percent of all business R&D expenditure.

These figures are more than simply eye-catching numbers; they act as an important reminder to policy makers of the pivotal role of software in the EU economy. We call upon these policy makers to further help create a legislative environment that realises the full potential of software for Europe’s economy and citizens.

Software thrives on innovation. It evolves at exponential speed, increasing European competitiveness by boosting all other sectors of the economy. Unlike more traditional sectors of the economy, software does not need an external catalyst to bring about change — it is the catalyst. As the rate of innovation accelerates, the EU must embrace its ability to respond to change. To harness the full potential of software-driven innovation, the EU should continue implementing policies that will continue to encourage innovation and capitalise on the contribution of software.

The EU has taken some very significant steps in the last few years to foster its digital economy, breaking down national barriers and harmonising rules and regulations with the objective of unifying its digital single market. We can do even more.

Ensuring the free movement of data across borders, not only within the EU, but also globally, is therefore paramount in ensuring that Europe stays abreast of data-driven innovations. In this light, the Commission’s upcoming initiative on the free flow of data is an opportunity to recognise the general principle of unimpeded data movements and remove unjustified data localisation rules across the EU. The Internet of Things is already revolutionising our lives and opening a new world of opportunities. By pursuing policies that foster innovation and adopting a thoughtful and timely legislative framework, EU lawmakers can enable the EU to reap the benefits of IoT.

Our health, our wealth, our work, our social lives, our leisure, and our security are all improved by software, and the promise of further benefits is limited only by our imagination. Software is the key to the benefits of the 21st century; the EU should seize the opportunity.

**The figures in this article come from a report released today by BSA | The Software Alliance, prepared with data provided by The Economist Intelligence Unit. Read the report, “Software: A €910 Billion Catalyst for the EU Economy”, here.

Software Meets Stethoscopes in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

posted by in Industry October 27, 2016

Software significantly impacts almost every part of our lives, and since October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month we’d like to recognize some of the great contributions software makes to fight cancer. Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer worldwide and it’s imperative that we do all we can to improve diagnosis and treatment, and work toward a cure.

We’re already doing great things with software, like using AI software to diagnose breast cancer 30 times faster with 99 percent accuracy. However, the rate at which any form of cancer grows and its response to treatments differs from person to person. So, some are turning toward a more individualized approach. But to make that happen, you need a way to collect and analyze information faster than humans can.
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Congratulations to BSA’s 2016 Girls Who Code Class!

posted by in Industry August 31, 2016

BSA’s Girls Who Code class of 2016 graduated this month, marking the end of an intensive seven-week coding program. While most of the 19 girls in the BSA classroom began the program with no knowledge of coding, they are now proficient in several programming languages, including Python, Scratch, HTML, and CSS. They have created websites and apps, met with Members of Congress, and have networked with leading women computer scientists and engineers.

Girls Who Code was founded in 2012 with the mission of closing the gender gap in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. In four years, Girls Who Code has gone from 20 girls in New York to 10,000 girls in 42 states. The program couldn’t have come at a better time. We need a well-trained pipeline of computer scientists in our software-dependent economy, and right now the software industry has more jobs than it can fill. By 2024 there will be 4.4 million jobs available in computer and information technology. Encouraging women to join this field is critical to fill this gap: Women held 36 percent of computing occupations in 1991, but just 25% in 2015.
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Racing to the Finish Line with Software

posted by in Industry August 8, 2016

The biggest sporting event of the summer has arrived, bringing together impressive elite athletes, dedicated fans, and innovative technologies. Software and data have become critical components of many athletes’ training regimens. While some of these technologies—like wearable heart rate monitors—are well known to the average sports fan, athletes use many more complex tech tools to better their performance. In the spirit of summer athletics, let’s look at some of BSA’s member companies’ contributions to sports technology:

  • The USA Women’s Cycling Team uses IBM’s cognitive computing and advanced analytics to improve their performance in Pursuit Cycling, a sport in which the team competes as a single unit. IBM’s Watson Internet of Things Platform, Analytics, and the IBM cloud work together to show real-time data, which the cyclists can view in their eyewear and the coaches can view on a dashboard.
  • The Microsoft Band 2, used by elite runners and cyclists, goes beyond simply recording heartrate and sleep. This wearable calculates calories, fats, and carbs burned; tracks athletes’ maximum, minimum, and average speeds; and even records UV exposure during training. The band can also examine the user’s heartrate and compare it to previously recorded data to determine his or her cardio progress.
  • ANSYS’ engineering simulation technology produces highly complex models of athletic performance and equipment. These models mimic real-world behavior to predict and address possible challenges. By varying the data in the models, designers can create equipment that helps minimize the risk of injury while improving an athlete’s performance.
  • By analyzing 15 years’ worth of NFL data last year, Splunk was able to accurately predict plays during football games. In doing so, Splunk proved how helpful big data is for coaches and players—whether the data analysis is used to predict a competitor’s next move or fake them out by doing the opposite of what they expect.
  • Thanks to a research project conducted by Oracle, stadium operators can deliver a more efficient and innovative experience to fans by improving inventory management, loyalty rewards, and third-party integrations for in-seat ordering. For example, in a recent survey conducted by Oracle, the company found that food and beverage technology is being underused in stadiums, despite a strong demand from sports fans. This finding is paving the way for the adoption of mobile ordering.

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The $1 Trillion Economic Impact of Software

posted by in Industry June 15, 2016

cover-techpost-275Today, I’ll be at New America talking about the impact software has on the economy. Software is at the forefront of American innovation — laying the groundwork for advances that promise to make businesses more efficient, jobs more plentiful, opportunities more pervasive, and the economy even more prosperous.

BSA | The Software Alliance has released “The $1 Trillion Economic Impact of Software,” a first-of-its-kind study conducted by researchers at The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) to quantify software’s impact on the US economy.

Here are a few key findings:

  • Software supports nearly 10 million jobs nationwide.
  • Software drives economic gains in all 50 states.
  • The average annual wage for a software developer is $108,760. That salary, along with big career prospects and satisfying work is why Glassdoor named “data scientist” as the best job for 2016 and CNN named “software architect” as the number one job for 2015.

Software jobs are interesting high paying jobs — but we need more engineers and coders.
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BSA Heads to the Hill

posted by in Industry May 20, 2016

On this past Wednesday, BSA | The Software Alliance hosted its annual fly-in. Board members from BSA spent the day on Capitol Hill meeting with Members of Congress to talk about policy priorities like ECPA reform, international data flows, TPP, and computer science education. Our delegation included representatives from Bentley, CA Technologies, Datastax, IBM, SAS Institute, Siemens, Splunk, Workday, and Dell.

Fly-ins help us share our industry advocacy priorities with Members of Congress and educate them about what our member companies do. Our fly-in was also a valuable way to thank lawmakers for their leadership on issues like the Judicial Redress Act, the Defend Trade Secrets Act, and patent legislation. On Wednesday, we met with 5 House Members and 9 Senators. Meetings with leadership included Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, and Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry.

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